Blog: Words and images

Rocky steps

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

In January I posted a featured gallery that included photos of steps. At that time I said I hadn’t realized I had unintentionally gathered photos showing stairs or steps. But there were several dozen photos in my collection, some that I’ve liked and used in galleries on other subjects and some that were rather unimpressive and filed away. But when viewed as a group it was obvious that I had a lot of photos of this subject.

Mandrill portrait

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

Every time I post a photo taken in a zoo, I make the same statement: I have more difficulty getting quality photos of animals in a zoo than I do in the wild.

It seems like it should be the other way around. After all, I know exactly where the animals are at a zoo. There are maps and signs showing where to find animals. Can't miss 'em. Just walk up to the pen and start shooting. …

Alert titmouse

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

I tend to laugh when I’m taking a photo of a Tufted Titmouse. The large, round eyes, small bill and brushy crest give the bird a permanent “surprised” expression on its face.

Titmice are common in forests here in Central Ohio and are frequent visitors to feeders in the area during winter months. The birds always select the largest seed they can find, carry it to a nearby perch and hit it with their bill until the seed cracks open. …

Capitol in sun

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

There are specific scenes that are essential In any collection of Washington, D.C., photos. The Capitol, the White House, the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial top the list.

But visitors to Washington during the last 18 months with hopes of including a nice photo of the Capitol in their travel shots have been disappointed.  The Capitol has been surrounded by construction cranes and the dome has been enclosed in more than a million pounds of scaffolding, including more than two miles of decking held by more than 52 miles of scaffold pipe. 

Brooklyn Bridge scenes

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Walking across the Brooklyn Bridge is still one of my favorite things to do in New York. The bridge is about a mile and a quarter long (it was, by far, the world’s longest suspension bridge when it was completed in 1883) with a wide pedestrian walkway above traffic. More than 4,000 pedestrians and 3,000 bicyclists cross the bridge each day, although I’ve been on the bridge on some nice-weather weekend days when it seems like all 7,000 walkers/cyclists are on it at the same time.