Blog: Words and images

Fence and shadows

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

When the weather turns cool and colorful leaves start falling I’m often drawn to the woods to add some autumn landscape photos to my files.

The woods are a wonderful place when fall leaves are at peak color, but my experience here in Central Ohio has taught me that peak color is fleeting at best. We seem to have a lot of years where leaves go from green to gone, skipping the colorful transition. A sudden cold rain at just the right (or wrong) time can clear the trees. 

Second grab

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

Standing at the edge of a wetlands area or beside a lake and watching an egret or heron hunt for food is extremely relaxing. 

The bird remains motionless for a long period of time as it watches fish swim nearby. When it makes a choice from the watery menu, the bird begins the almost imperceptible process of lowering its head before striking quickly to catch a fish. 

It will hold the fish in its beak for a few minutes, occasionally tossing it in the air and re-catching it to position it before swallowing. …

Haze in the hills

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

Many of my photos evoke memories of the moment I captured the scene or activities that led to the photo. My primary memory when seeing this 2006 photo is of the tiring hike that put me in position to get the shot. 

This photo of fog obscuring distant hills in Ohio’s Hocking Hills was taken from a rock ledge overlooking a valley below the rim trail in Conkle’s Hollow State Nature Preserve. It was my first visit to that park and I wasn’t sure what to expect. 

The Washington Monument

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The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., the subject of my featured gallery for October, is one of the most recognizable monuments or memorials in the United States. It’s just a simple obelisk. Just about every city — and every cemetery — has at least one obelisk used as a memorial. But even people who don’t know the word “obelisk” recognize that those other structures look like the Washington Monument.

Considering that, I guess I can safely say that the Washington Monument is the most famous obelisk.