01.05.20: Robot Resurrection

Robot Resurrection breathes fire while stretching its arms against a San Diego sky in Balboa Park.

Robot Resurrection breathes fire while stretching its arms against a San Diego sky in Balboa Park.

Attention getting, but just part of the Faire

Robot Resurrection shoots fire from its hand in San Diego's Balboa Park.

‍Tech specs

  • Date/time: Oct, 7, 2018, 3:02 p.m.
  • Location: 32°43'53.135" N 117°8'52.349" W (Show in Google Maps)
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon EF 18-135mm                       f/3.5-5.6 (42mm) 
  • Aperture: f/5.6
  • Shutter: 1/2000th second
  • ISO: 200

‍I’ve seen a number of strange and memorable sights when I’ve been out with my camera, but this 30-foot tall, fire-breathing, laser-shooting robot tops the list.

‍My wife and I were walking through San Diego’s Balboa Park, enjoying the scenery on a sunny day, when we turned left on a trail and encountered Robot Resurrection, arms extended, breathing fire and looking happy.

‍Needless to say, it got our attention.

‍As I was staring at the robot I had a sudden urge to look over my shoulder. I think it was a defense mechanism developed from watching so many science fiction movies in my life. After all, Robot Resurrection is just the sort of thing that aliens would send to hold our attention while they attacked from the rear. But the only things I saw behind me were a 17-foot tall mechanical giraffe that played music and a couple of giant mechanical preying mantises that breathed fire.

‍We had wandered into a very strange place — San Diego’s Maker Faire.

‍I admit that I had never heard of Maker Faire, but this was an excellent introduction to a unique event described on the Maker Faire website as “Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages gathering of tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and commercial exhibitors. All of these ‘makers’ come to Maker Faire to show what they have made and to share what they have learned.”

‍The Maker Faire event in San Diego we found in 2018 was one of more than 30 large-scale Featured Maker Faires that have been held around the world.

‍I’m sure that each Maker Faire has unique displays, but it would be hard to top Robot Resurrection.

‍Shane Evans, an artist from Denver, built Robot Resurrection over eight months in 2014 from  what he refers to as “junk” — primarily used airplane parts and other recycled material. The sculpture, which weighs more than a ton, moves, breathes fire, shoots fire from its hands and shoots lasers. It is controlled from a cockpit in the torso.

‍Robot Resurrection makes numerous appearances around the United States. It is modular, but takes a crew up to eight hours to assemble at each location.

‍And I guarantee one thing: If you see Robot Resurrection, you won’t forget it. But be sure to check over your shoulder, just in case. You never know …

Shane Evans, an artist from Denver, built Robot Resurrection over eight months in 2014 from  what he refers to as “junk” — primarily used airplane parts and other recycled material. 

Robot Resurrection breathes fire while stretching its arms against a San Diego sky in Balboa Park.