‍02.02.20: Robot street art

‍Tech specs

  • Date/time: Aug. 30, 2016, 11:37 a.m.
  • Location: 40°44'51" N 74°0'17.999" W (Show in Google Maps)
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II 
  • Lens: Canon EF 24-70 2.8L (70mm) 
  • Aperture: f/2.8
  • Shutter: 1/6400th second
  • ISO: 400

‍An art scene

‍seen from

‍The High Line

‍There are a lot of “traditional” free things to do in New York City to fill some open time, like visiting Times Square, walking across the Brooklyn Bridge or taking a stroll through Central Park.

‍But one of the city’s newer features, The High Line, has become one of my favorite sites to visit. 

‍The High Line, a 1.45 mile elevated linear park and greenway, has become a destination for both tourists and locals. It was built on a disused — and, since 1980, pretty much abandoned — section of the West Side Line of the New York Central Railroad. The efforts to repurpose the viaduct, which had become an eyesore, into an urban park began in 2006. The first section opened in 2009. The final section opened in 2014. 

‍The park runs from 34th Street near the Javits Center (the northern end) to Ganesvoort Street, three blocks below 14th Street in the Meatpacking District (the southern end) and, in most places, is only as wide as a traditional railroad right-of-way.

‍The park is filled with art exhibits, which makes for a fun and interesting walk. But the art painted on nearby buildings can be just as interesting, which makes me constantly scan the surroundings for interesting city scenes to photograph.

‍This photo shows a mural on the side of a building at 10th Avenue and West 22nd Street, framed by nearby buildings. The mural of a fancy robot lady is by famed Italian street artist Pixel Pancho.

‍When I saw the mural I immediately liked how the robot lady seemed to be leaning back to see around the building. So I took a photo.

‍The rail line ran behind and between buildings, so when The High Line first opened it was surrounded by rather ugly urban scenery … most often graffiti-filled backs of buildings. But in the decade since The High Line opened property owners have either cleaned up  the walls adjacent to the park or demolished old buildings and replaced them with new ones with attractive entrances in front on the street and in back along The High Line. Real estate ads market condos/apartments and retail/office space as “on The High Line.”

‍It all started with an idea for a park on an old rail line. It led to millions of dollars in urban improvement.



A fancy robot lady mural by Italian street artist Pixel Pancho on a building at 10th Avenue and W. 22nd Street can be seen from The High Line, a 22-block long public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side, New York City.

A fancy robot lady mural by Italian street artist Pixel Pancho on a building at 10th Avenue and W. 22nd Street can be seen from The High Line, a 22-block long public park built on a historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side, New York City.

‍The park is filled with art exhibits, which makes for a fun and interesting walk. But the art painted on nearby buildings can be just as interesting.

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Photographs and text: Copyright - Pat D. Hemlepp. All rights reserved. Photographs may not be used without permission.

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