04.17.22: Promenade in a park

When I look at this photo now it almost seems as if I’ve encountered two aliens that have stopped to admire the Daniels & Fisher Tower, a Denver landmark, that stands in the background. 

Chasing explanation for odd Denver art

I like street art. I’ve photographed it in many cities in many countries. It’s something that’s always interested me.

But a street art installation I found in 2007 while walking in Skyline Park, a small downtown “linear” park in downtown Denver, had me … well … I’m not sure if the right word is intrigued or confused. But it was interesting, so I photographed it and planned to research it later.

The sculpture consisted of two bronze somewhat basket-like structures, about seven feet tall and narrow at the ends with bulges in the middle, similar to vertical pythons after a meal. The sculptures seemed to be gazing at the Denver buildings at the end of the park.

When I returned home after the trip I learned that the sculptures likely were gazing at the buildings.

The sculpture, by artist Ann Weber, is called Promenade and represents two people on a walk, “promenading” through Skyline Park. The artist intended the sculpture to be larger than life for impact, but wanted it to be close enough to human size to not be intimidating.

When I look at this photo now it almost seems as if I’ve encountered two aliens that have stopped to admire the Daniels & Fisher Tower, a Denver landmark, that stands in the background. The one on the left seems to be leaning, whispering to the one on the right.

Or maybe it’s just me.

The Daniels & Fisher Tower behind Promenade is a historic Denver site. When built as part of the Daniels & Fisher department store in 1910, it was the tallest building between the Mississippi River and the state of California at a height of 325 feet. The tower was designed by architect Frederick Sterner and modeled after The Campanile (St. Mark's Bell Tower) at the Piazza San Marco in Venice, Italy. The 20-floor clock tower has clock faces on all four sides.

While Daniels & Fisher Tower has a storied history, Skyline Park’s history (like the park itself) is shorter and less impressive.

The park was completed in 1976, covering about a three and a half block long, 100-foot wide swath in the heart of downtown. The park was developed during urban renewal efforts in the late 1960s. It provided space in the downtown area but it didn’t turn out to be space that was especially useful. During the decades that followed, city leaders have redesigned and changed use of the space, making it more of a downtown destination with winter ice skating, a beer garden and live music.

Promenade, a bronze sculpture by Ann Weber, stands in Skyline Park in downtown Denver.

Promenade, a bronze sculpture by Ann Weber, stands in Skyline Park in downtown Denver.

Tech specs

  • Date/time: Jun 19, 2007 8:59 AM   
  • Camera: Canon EOS 20D
  • Lens: 10.0-22.0 mm 
  • Focal length: 17mm
  • Aperture: f/16
  • Shutter: 1/30 second
  • ISO: 200

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