10.23.22: Hollyhock growing wild

Hollyhock growing wild, Slate Run Metro Park, Canal Winchester, Ohio.

Hollyhock growing wild, Slate Run Metro Park, Canal Winchester, Ohio.

Plant thriving alone in field a surprise

Tech specs

  • Date/time: Jul 28, 2013 10:32 AM   
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: EF600mm f/4L IS USM +1.4x 
  • Focal length: 840mm
  • Aperture: f/5.6
  • Shutter: 1/250 second
  • ISO: 400

There are times when I set out to photograph flowers. I grab a macro (or close-up) lens, a tripod and couple of flash units to provide controlled lighting, find a patch of flowers, determine which ones would be best to shoot, set up the equipment and go to work. It can be a lengthy process.

Then there are times when I’m on one of my wildlife photo hikes and see a flower that would be perfect to photograph. I don’t have my macro lens with me. I don’t have a tripod. I don’t have flash units. All I have is the long, heavy 600 millimeter super telephoto lens and a 1.4x teleconverter that I use when photographing wildlife. It’s ideal for wildlife photos, but it means I’m shooting close-up photos of flowers from more than 18 feet away. It’s not the typical way to shoot flower photos, but it works.

This is one of those“improvised” flower photos.

I was hiking through a wetlands area in Slate Run Metro Park southeast of Columbus, Ohio, photographing birds, when I saw this large, flowering hollyhock plant growing wild. It was probably more than four feet tall so the flowers were above other plants in the field, providing an uncluttered background. The morning sun was providing perfect light. So I decided to get a photo.

I like how the pink and white petals stand out against the solid green background.

But I admit I was surprised to find a healthy, tall hollyhock growing alone in the middle of a field adjacent to a wetlands. The only times I’ve seen hollyhocks have been in garden settings, where they’ve been planted, cultivated and cared for. This one was no place close to a garden setting. Since hollyhocks self seed, I’m assuming a bird must have transferred a seed to the field where the plant flourished.  It was an interesting find.

I admit I was surprised to find a healthy, tall hollyhock growing alone in the middle of a field adjacent to a wetlands. The only times I’ve seen hollyhocks have been in garden settings, where they’ve been planted, cultivated and cared for. 

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