10.24.21: Ready to eat

Yellow-rumped Warbler eating a bug during winter migration south, Sharon Woods Metro Park, Westerville, Ohio.

Yellow-rumped Warbler eating a bug during winter migration south, Sharon Woods Metro Park, Westerville, Ohio.

Stopping for a meal while traveling south

I'm not a bird watcher. I'm a photo hobbyist who happens to shoot birds primarily because it is a huge challenge. Every shot is a combination of planning, preparation and luck. 

The Yellow-rumped Warbler is one bird whose name accurately describes its look.

The bird has a patch of yellow on its rump, which makes the bird very easy to identify. That patch remains year-round — both in the winter when the bird’s plumage is pale brown with maybe a touch of yellow on the wings (as shown in this photo) and in the spring and summer when the bird molts to its very striking breeding plumage of gray, black, white and yellow shown in this photo.

I photographed this bird in Sharon Woods Metro Park, north of Columbus, Ohio, on a November morning. It was migrating south for the winter and had already molted to its fall non-breeding plumage. 

I get nearly all of my warbler photos during the spring, when the birds are migrating north from their winter homes in Central and South America, or occasionally in the fall during migration south. 

While I often see warblers in local parks in the spring and fall, the best place to see a wide variety is in Magee Marsh Wildlife Area and other neighboring parks along Lake Erie in Northern Ohio during a few weeks each spring. Warblers' migration often includes non-stop flights of a thousand miles or more, so when they do make a stop they must feed constantly to refuel. That's what happens in May along the Ohio side of Lake Erie. The trees are filled with a variety of warblers, all feeding on insects to refuel before another long flight across the lake to get to their summer breeding grounds in Canada.

I'm not a bird watcher. I'm a photo hobbyist who happens to shoot birds primarily because it is a huge challenge. Every shot is a combination of planning, preparation and luck. But bird watchers live for the spring warbler migration. Magee Marsh is packed every year on Mother's Day weekend when the spring warbler migration is at its peak. There's even a website — The Biggest Week in American Birding — dedicated to the migration through Magee Marsh.

Tech specs

  • Date/time: Nov 9, 2014 10:03 AM   
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Lens: EF600mm f/4L IS USM +1.4x 
  • Focal length: 840mm
  • Aperture: f/5.6
  • Shutter: 1/1600 second
  • ISO: 1600

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